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Gazelle Gazette

The "Gazelle Gazette" is a Carder Steuben Club Newsletter that is initially delivered as an email and is maintained by Alan Shovers. This section provides an archive of the Gazelle Gazette Newsletter postings. If you would like to submit a Newsletter posting or have your email address added to Alan's address list, please email it to Alan Shovers.


Search Gazelle Gazette issues by key word:  
Carder Steuben Bowl - 6769




Cut Glass Lamps

Posting Number 3324   Date: 12/04/19     Return to Posting List

Alan,

I have a question tied to the Rockwell collection.

I remember seeing a cut glass lamp (base and dome shade) that was identified as being Carder Steuben.

Does anyone have a photo of it? Does any one know of other examples? Was this perhaps a product of a cut glass house using Steuben blanks? Does anyone know how to determine if a Steuben blank was use for such a lamp?

Jack Hartwein-Sanchez

Answers To Question About A Grotesque Piece

Alan -

The vase that is the subject of Fran Gabel's inquiry is shape 7564. The glass is Ivrene (not Calcite).

There is a coordinating pair of candlesticks of the same shape number. Examples of both can be found in the Shape Gallery as well as in figure 9.16 on page 205 of Tom Dimitroff's book. The candlesticks are also shown in Tom's book in figure 5.12 on page 120.

As Tom points out in the text accompanying figure 5.12, the 7564 candlesticks are frequently misidentified as shape 7563 because of the similarity of design to the centerbowl shape 7563.

├┐However, the centerbowl shape 7563 has its own set of coordinating candlesticks. See figure 5.71 in Tom's book at page 136.

Scott Hansen

Shape #7564

Another response

Fran, the example that forwarded is an Ivrene vase that Steuben produced late in the Carder era and early in the Houghton era. If a person is not sure whether it is Calcite or Ivrene as both were produced as shades, The calcite appear as a yellowish white and the Ivrene will be a white white. The vase that is pictured came in two sizes. I believe that it is in the 1932 catalog and is listed as a vase, but I'm not sure. Later the larger size is listed as a centerbowl and is shown with a pair of candlesticks which carry the same number about 1935 in Leavy's papers.

Bobby Rockwell

Another Response

Hello Fran,

Unless I am way off base, I believe this vase is IVRENE not Calcite. Carder also made numerous lamp shades of various shapes.

Regards,

David P. Donaldson, MFA

Another Response

In response to Fran Gable's question,

Steuben did make Iridized Calcite by spraying the items with tin chloride. I have owned a pair of ACB Iridized Calcite Lamp shades. This type of glass was most common in lamp shades, and lighting domes.

Some people think Calcite was only used only for lighting but the Calcite bowl 2851 was a production item. Great care must be taken to not confuse them with Ivrene. If the objects are Ivrene they will be very opaque and resemble opaque milk glass. If they are Iridized Calcite when held to a light source they will be semi opaque and will emit a milky cream color. It truly is a beautiful color and type of glass and I would encourage any collector to obtain one of these rare examples especially if it was in the form of a solid Calcite decorative item like a vase or bowl.

├┐I owned a Calcite Centerpiece Bowl whimsey item decorated in Rouge Flambe Mat-su- no-ke flowers. Calcite was used almost exclusively for lighting purposes. Sorry, but your vase pictured was Ivrene.

Rande Bly from Alabama

Compliments Always Welcome

Enjoy everything I receive in my emails. Thanks

Ileen Lummus


Images:
Click to view image one: Vase11.jpeg
Click to view image two: 7564.jpeg

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