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Gazelle Gazette

The "Gazelle Gazette" is a Carder Steuben Club Newsletter that is initially delivered as an email and is maintained by Alan Shovers. This section provides an archive of the Gazelle Gazette Newsletter postings. If you would like to submit a Newsletter posting or have your email address added to Alan's address list, please email it to Alan Shovers.


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Carder Steuben Vase - 6287




From the Yale University Collection

Posting Number 3368   Date: 03/06/20     Return to Posting List

Vase

Designer: Frederick Carder, American, born England, 18631963

Manufacturer: Steuben Glass Works, American, 19031932

Date: 1932

Medium: Blown glass

Accession Number: 2017.105.1

Culture: American

Period: 20th century

Classification: Containers - Glass

Status: Not on view

Aurene vase

Designer: Frederick Carder, American, born England, 18631963

Manufacturer: Steuben Glass Works, American, 19031932

Date: ca. 1910

Medium: Iridescent greenish gold glass with flashes of pink and blue

Accession Number: 2003.121.2

Culture: American

Period: 20th century

Classification: Containers - Glass

Status: Not on view

Dessert cup

Designer: Frederick Carder, American, born England, 18631963

Manufacturer: Steuben Glass Works, American, 19031932

Date: ca. 1910

Medium: Iridescent glass, yellow inside and white outside

Accession Number: 1972.18.14

Culture: American

Period: 20th century

Classification: Containers - Glass

Status: Not on view

Dessert bowl

Designer: Frederick Carder, American, born England, 18631963

Manufacturer: Steuben Glass Works, American, 19031932

Date: ca. 1910

Medium: Iridescent glass, yellow inside and white outside

Accession Number: 1972.18.27

Culture: American

Period: 20th century

Classification: Containers - Glass

Status: Not on view

Pair of perfume bottles

Designer: Frederick Carder, American, born England, 18631963

Manufacturer: Steuben Glass Works, American, 19031932

Manufacturer Division of: Corning Glass Works, American, 18781990

Date: 192032

Medium: Blue Aurene blown glass

Accession Number: 2000.78.3.1-.2

Culture: American

Period: 20th century

Classification: Containers - Glass

Status: Not on view

More From Yale Collection To Come

As one of her research interests, Gail Bardhan, retired librarian from the Rakow Research Library at CMoG, kept a list of American museums with Carder glass in their collection. I have used her research to find examples of Carder glass in the collection of the Yale University Art Gallery. Scott Hansen

From The New York Times

Amory Houghton Jr., Who Went From Corning to Congress, Dies at 93

He led his familys venerable glass works company before entering the House from upstate New York and becoming a voice of moderation in a hard-right Republican Party.

Amory Houghton Jr., a Republican congressman from upstate New York, in 1999. As his party turned hard to the right, he broke with it on issues like gun control and abortion.Credit...Douglas Graham/Congressional Quarterly, via Getty Images

By Joseph P. Fried

March 5, 2020

Amory Houghton Jr., who stepped down as head of his familys venerable glass works corporation to serve for two decades as a wealthy congressman from upstate New York, becoming a leading moderate Republican voice who defied his partys hard-right turn, died on Wednesday at his home in Corning, N.Y. He was 93. His family announced his death.

Mr. Houghton (pronounced HOE-ton), who was widely known as Amo, was elected to Congress in 1986 after a long tenure as chairman and chief executive of Corning Glass Works (now Corning Incorporated). One of the worlds biggest glass makers, it was founded in 1851 by a great-great-grandfather, also named Amory Houghton. In his first race for the House, Mr. Houghton, a scion of one of the most prominent families in upstate New York, handily won an open seat in a predominantly Republican district whose dairy farms and small-city industrial centers would later run into economic hard times. He easily won eight re-election races.

With a fortune estimated at $420 million by Forbes magazine in 1991 (the equivalent of about $804 million today), Mr. Houghton was described in news reports as one of the wealthiest members of Congress if not the wealthiest, although he had been known for driving a 10-year-old Volkswagen while leading Corning and eating in the company cafeteria. (While in Congress, he drove a Ford Taurus station wagon.)

In the House he disagreed with a majority of his fellow Republicans on some of the most contentious issues facing them.

Mr. Houghton was one of only six Republicans who voted against the 2002 resolution that authorized President George W. Bush to go to war in Iraq. And he was one of only three from his party who voted against the big tax cuts that were another hallmark of the Bush administration.

In 1998, with his party in control of the House, he was one of just five Republicans who voted against impeaching President Bill Clinton on a perjury charge stemming from his affair with a White House intern, and he was one of 12 voting no on a charge of obstruction of justice.

In the House debate on the Iraq resolution, coming a little more than a year after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, Mr. Houghton allowed that the Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein was bad, and someday we should deal with him. But he insisted that the United States must finish our war on terrorism before we take on another fight. In 2013, nearly a decade after retiring, he told The Huffington Post that during the war resolution debate he did not believe that Iraq had been building weapons of mass destruction, the White Houses main argument for going to war.

Amory Houghton Jr. was born in Corning on Aug. 7, 1926. Amory Sr. would become president and chairman of Corning Glass Works and later ambassador to France under President Dwight D. Eisenhower. Mr. Houghtons mother, Laura (Richardson) Houghton, a native of Providence, R.I., was a philanthropist and former chairwoman of the Girl Scouts of America. His grandfather Alanson Bigelow Houghton, also a Corning president and member of Congress from New York State, served as ambassador to Germany under President Warren G. Harding and to Britain under Calvin Coolidge. After serving in the Marine Corps in 1945 and 46, Mr. Houghton earned a bachelors degree and a masters in business administration, both from Harvard. He followed the family line into Corning in 1952, rising to chairman and chief executive 12 years later. He was the fifth generation of his family to head the company.

He went on to guide Corning to recovery after it suffered severe financial reversals during a national economic downturn in the 1970s. Inheriting a company that had been a leading maker of cookware, fine crystal glassware and glass casings for television tubes, he pushed it toward developing optical fiber and other new materials. Corning products today include clean-air technologies, advanced components for the semiconductor industry and display glass for high-performance digital tablets, notebooks and televisions.

Mr. Houghtons marriage to Ruth Frances West in 1950 ended in divorce. His second wife, Priscilla (Dewey) Houghton, died in 2012.

He is survived by two daughters, Sara Houghton Grayson and Quincy Houghton; two sons, Amory III and Robert; his brother, Jamie; nine grandchildren; and a great-grandson.

Well after leaving Congress, Mr. Houghton remained outspoken about national politics and, in frequent interviews and letters to the editor of upstate New York publications, was rueful that the partisan differences he had worked to overcome in the House had grown only more bitter, both in the House and among Americans generally. He was openly critical of President Trump, calling him divisive.

But Mr. Houghton remained optimistic. The pendulum swings back and forth in life, and it sure does in politics, he told The Leader, a newspaper in Corning, in 2017. I really believe in my heart that weve got a terrific future ahead of us.

Julia Carmel contributed reporting.


Images:
Click to view image one: Vase3.jpeg
Click to view image two: Aurene Vase1.jpeg
Click to view image three: Dessert Cup.jpeg
Click to view image four: Dessert Bowl.jpeg
Click to view image five: Perfume Bottle Pair.jpeg
Click to view image six: Amory Houghton.jpeg

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