Carder Steuben Gazelle Lighting Grill

Carder Steuben Club Site Menu

 Home

 Shape Gallery

    · Recent Additions

    · All Etchings

    · All Cuttings

 Gazelle Gazette

 Membership

 Symposium

    · Photos

    · '19 Program

    · '19 Catalog

    · Corning Info

 Advertising

 Colors

 Contributors

 Etched Patterns

 Intarsia

 News and Events

 Post Carder Era

 Shapes

 Signatures

 Stoppers

 Undocumented

 Vetting

 Website Use




  Encouraging and promoting the collecting and enjoyment   
of the glass of Frederick Carder   


About Frederick Carder  |  About Carder Steuben Glass  |  About the Club  |  Contact Us     

Gazelle Gazette

The "Gazelle Gazette" is a Carder Steuben Club Newsletter that is initially delivered as an email and is maintained by Alan Shovers. This section provides an archive of the Gazelle Gazette Newsletter postings. If you would like to submit a Newsletter posting or have your email address added to Alan's address list, please email it to Alan Shovers.


Search Gazelle Gazette issues by key word:  
Carder Steuben Puff Box - 6163




Carder Steuben and Modern Steuben From the Brooklyn Museum Collection

Posting Number 3376   Date: 03/25/20     Return to Posting List

Vase

DECORATIVE ARTS

On View: Luce Visible Storage and Study Center, 5th Floor

CULTURE American

DESIGNER Frederick Carder, American, born England, 1863-1963

MAKER Steuben Glass, a division of Corning Glass Works, 1903-2011

MEDIUM Opalescent glass

Place Manufactured: Corning, New York, United States

DATES 1900-1920

DIMENSIONS 2 1/2 x 2 3/4 x 2 3/4 in. (6.4 x 7 x 7 cm) (show scale)

MARKINGS Scratched on base: "Aurene / 2647"

SIGNATURE no signature

INSCRIPTIONS no inscriptions

COLLECTIONS Decorative Arts

MUSEUM LOCATION This item is on view in Luce Visible Storage and Study Center, 5th Floor

ACCESSION NUMBER 67.120.98

CREDIT LINE Bequest of Laura L. Barnes

RIGHTS STATEMENT Creative Commons-BY CAPTION American. Vase, 1900-1920. Opalescent glass, 2 1/2 x 2 3/4 x 2 3/4 in. (6.4 x 7 x 7 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Bequest of Laura L. Barnes, 67.120.98. Creative Commons-BY (Photo: Brooklyn Museum, 67.120.98.jpg) IMAGE overall, 67.120.98.jpg. Brooklyn Museum photograph, 2004

CATALOGUE DESCRIPTION Miniature vase, opalescent glass. Amber glass with gold overwash, changing to rose at base and blue on foot. Spherical body; wide, open mouth with no neck; tapering below waist to narrow footed base. Condition: Good

Roundel

DECORATIVE ARTS

DESIGNER Frederick Carder, American, born England, 1863-1963

MAKER Steuben Glass, a division of Corning Glass Works, 1903-2011

MEDIUM Opalescent glass

Place Manufactured: Corning, New York, United States

DATES ca. 1920

DIMENSIONS 1/8 x 17 1/2 x 17 7/8 in. (0.3 x 44.5 x 45.4 cm) (show scale)

MARKINGS no marks

SIGNATURE no signature

INSCRIPTIONS no inscriptions

COLLECTIONS Decorative Arts

MUSEUM LOCATION This item is not on view

ACCESSION NUMBER 72.40.4

CREDIT LINE H. Randolph Lever Fund

RIGHTS STATEMENT Creative Commons-BY CAPTION Frederick Carder (American, born England, 1863-1963). Roundel, ca. 1920. Opalescent glass, 1/8 x 17 1/2 x 17 7/8 in. (0.3 x 44.5 x 45.4 cm). Brooklyn Museum, H. Randolph Lever Fund, 72.40.4. Creative Commons-BY (Photo: Brooklyn Museum, 72.40.4_bw.jpg) IMAGE overall, 72.40.4_bw.jpg. Brooklyn Museum photograph

CATALOGUE DESCRIPTION Roundel, opalescent glass, in Art Nouveau manner. Large, thin, irregular, flat white roundel surrounded by narrow applied and folded blue rim; roundel is out of plane. Front side entirely covered with iridescent spiraling feather-like decoration in green-gold, with eight evenly spaced blue and purple ovoid accents, reminiscent of peacock feather eyes. Reverse side of white is undecorated. Visible prunt at center. Small chip in rim. Condition: Very good

Plate, "St. Tropez," Part of Nine-Piece Setting

DECORATIVE ARTS

On View: Luce Visible Storage and Study Center, 5th Floor

MANUFACTURER Steuben Glass, a division of Corning Glass Works, 1903-2011

DESIGNER Walter Dorwin Teague, American, 1883-1960

MEDIUM Glass

Place Manufactured: Corning, New York, United States

DATES ca. 1933

DIMENSIONS 3/4 x 8 1/2 x 8 1/2 in. (1.9 x 21.6 x 21.6 cm) (show scale)

MARKINGS no marks

SIGNATURE no signature

INSCRIPTIONS no inscriptions

COLLECTIONS Decorative Arts

MUSEUM LOCATION This item is on view in Luce Visible Storage and Study Center, 5th Floor

ACCESSION NUMBER 72.40.23

CREDIT LINE H. Randolph Lever Fund

RIGHTS STATEMENT Creative Commons-BY CAPTION Steuben Glass, a division of Corning Glass Works, 1903-2011. Plate, "St. Tropez," Part of Nine-Piece Setting, ca. 1933. Glass, 3/4 x 8 1/2 x 8 1/2 in. (1.9 x 21.6 x 21.6 cm). Brooklyn Museum, H. Randolph Lever Fund, 72.40.23. Creative Commons-BY (Photo: Brooklyn Museum, 72.40.23_bw.jpg) IMAGE overall, 72.40.23_bw.jpg. Brooklyn Museum photograph

CATALOGUE DESCRIPTION Plate, part of a nine-piece setting, "St. Tropez" pattern. Colorless hand-blown glass, with hand-cut and hand-engraved decoration. Circular shape. Cut decoration consists of diagonal straight lines forming large diamonds around border of plate, the over-all resembling a star. At top of each diamond is an engraved circle. Three graduated engraved circles suspended from the bottom of each diamond toward the center of plate. Broad engraved band going around the edge of plate above the diamonds. Condition: Scratch at center of plate, otherwise excellent.

More on Walter Dorwin Teague's Designs

"Image was paramount to Teague. 'We must work to establish Steuben as the finest glassware in America, worth all we ask for it. I believe we can make the ownership of Steuben glass one of those evidences of solvency----like the ownership of a Cadillac sixteen or a house in the right neighborhood.' Teague's outspoken consultancy culminated in a memorandum on Steuben policy circulated to Amory Houghton and other Steuben officials in October 1932. This document is the first written expression of the so-called Steuben Trilogy--the corporate philosophy that guided Steuben's course after 1933. "This is what we have to sell: that delicate excellence possible only when the finest crystal is worked with the ultimate in craftsmanship into designs that come alive with style." Wisely, Teague realized that Steuben could not compete with mass produced wares in a general market. The appeal was to status: "Steuben can achieve universal recognition as the ultimate in glass. It can become a demonstration or an advertisement of its owner's good taste and savoir faire. To have Steuben glass in your home and on your table will register you among those who know the right things.'" pp. 65-66, Steuben Gass An American Tradition in Crystal by Mary Jean Madigan.

Next To Come Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum.

As one of her research interests, Gail Bardhan, retired librarian from the Rakow Research Library at CMoG, kept a list of American museums with Carder glass in their collection. I have used her research to find examples of Carder glass in the collection of the Brooklyn Museum and on to the Cooper Hewitt. Scott Hansen


Images:
Click to view image one: Vase10.jpeg
Click to view image two: Roundel.jpeg
Click to view image three: Plate.jpeg

Return to Posting List



About Frederick Carder  |  About Carder Steuben Glass  |  About the Carder Steuben Club  |  Contact Us

Carder Steuben Shape Gallery  |  Gazelle Gazette  |  Membership  |  Terms and Conditions of Use
©2020 Carder Steuben Club Inc. | Find our mailing address in the Contact Us section.  | info@cardersteubenclub.org  |  Site by SDI WebLink